About your Search

20130101
20130131
STATION
CNBC 22
FBC 10
CNNW 4
CNN 2
CSPAN2 2
KCSM (PBS) 2
KQED (PBS) 2
KRCB (PBS) 2
CSPAN 1
LINKTV 1
WETA 1
WJZ (CBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 48
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 52 (some duplicates have been removed)
. the problem is, of course, that he has euro skeptics breathing down his neck in britain in his own party, and i think he is banking on germany and france in particular wanting very much to keep britain in the club, which, of course, they do, but i think he may be puckering too high. the german business community reacted in a very still a way to the threat of but leaving, saying that the german economy would be able to cope with that, though it would of course regret it. even more important, perhaps, the united states reacted very negatively. the relationship between britain and the united states has been the mainstay of british foreign policy for more than a century. yesterday, a member of the state department said that if britain were to leave the european union, that would seriously damage the special relationship between washington and london. >> thank you very much. >> to washington now where u.s. senator john kerry is president obama's choice for the next secretary of state. he has been quizzed by senators ahead of his recommendation. >> the issues like climate change and fighting d
stronger than expected. it rose in january, current conditions 108 versus the expectations of 107. euro/dollar is about 1% higher on the back of that news. the ifo institute, current conditions, 108. headline index, 104.2 versus 103. ross, what do you make of it? >> well, you can see what's going on with the euro there, 134. let's get more from finland. good to see you, alex. thanks indeed for joining us. the defense here that we're no longer in crisis fighting mode, the question as we look at data in germany, the question is whether we've made a fundamental turn, a fundamental change and whether things are temporary. >> i certainly hope we've made a fundamental turn. if this crisis is 100 steps, i'd say we are about 60 steps down the road. now, really, we have the fundamental institutional things in place. so that has calmed down the markets. what we now need is political stability. i think the italian election is one thing and the second thing we need in europe more than anything else is -- >> yeah. we thought stabilizing the crisis in terms of the bond spreads playing out was hard. g
of the most indebted regions asking madrid for more than nine million euros. >>> roche strides lower after posting solid earnings on strong sales of its cancer medicine. analysts warn about the loss of exclusive rights to a key chemotherapy drug. >>> game over for super mario and friend to turn a profit. nintendo unexpectedly swings to its full-year forecast to a loss showing a poor uptake for its wii u consoles. >>> see you in september. australia's prime minister sets a surprise election date saying it will create certainty for business. >>> okay. welcome to today's program. and you know, we spent all that time waiting for five. today it's about the ten. >> how long did it take you to come up with that? >> about ten seconds ago. >> very good. we're talking about mobile phones. >> yeah. >> do you think people can guess we're talking about the iphone 5. you're waiting for 5. >> you'll about the 10, ladies and gentlemen, blackberry 10. is it the rim lazarus move? >> we saw stocks get whacked yesterday. >>> in corporate news, a couple of things to keep an eye on in markets. the italian oil c
. they're about to repay hundreds of millions of dollars in emergency loans sending the euro to a 11-month high. currency investor axle merck says the euro could be the rock star this year. he is here to explain. tracy: this blowup capsule the future of space? you heard it about had here first last week. the head of the company that makes nasa's new experiment will tell us how the thing works. and how it is expandable as to inflatable. ashley: there is your space lab right there. tracy: but it is top of the hour. time for stocks as we do every 15 minutes. nicole petallides on the floor of the exchange. >> all right. good way to kick off the hour. let's just get to the markets. i think we'll save ourselves. let's take a look here at the dow, the nasdaq and the s&p. as we noted we've been sitting here at five-year highs and not too far off all-time highs. look at dow industrials. 13,881. you are. our high of the day was 13,887. these are the highest levels we've seen in five years. of course our all-time high, there it is right on cue, closing high, 14,164 and change. we're not too far
. the german euro booked a 1 million litigation charge which led to restructuring. in an analyst call, it was said the group does not need to issue more sales but left the door open for the cocoa bonds to comply with u.s. regulations. >> meanwhile, santander shares are trading lower after the net profit more than halved to 2.2 billion euros in 2012, hurt by write-downs on property asset necessary spain and a slowdown in latin america. santander says it's returning more than 24 billion worth of ltr loans having taken 35 billion in ultra cheap etr funding. shares down about 2.5%. there's stephane pedrazzi now joins us from madrid. stephane, what's the reaction? >> we've seen a limited market reaction at the open. it's now trading 2.5% lower. the numbers were below expectations. the net profits were the weakest for the last 13 years. 2.21 billion euros. the contends of reuters was at 2.5 billion. there were some massive provisions last year. it's not a big surprise. 18.8 billion euros in total to cover potential losses on the property portfolio. santander says it has completed now its pr
ounce. in the euro, falling to one week low against the u.s. dollar amongst speculation a large investor is selling the greenback. the euro fell to $1.32 in intraday trading. there was speculation he was selling the euro, that expect investor. david: a huge day for apple, which of course is in most peoples portfolipeople's portfor another. in the pits of the cme, and our market panel to talk over apple and all the other news of the day. jerry leavy and david wright, managing director at sierra investment management. tim at the cme. i would say everybody is focused on apple right now. what are expectations in chicago? >> everybody is focused, but i am not so sure it is this quarter. what they will do for the quarter and in march. it will really be key, specifically apple lowers expectations, but the concern is they might not get away with it this time. having said that, why i say this quarter may not be so big. they were originally looking for $11.77 or sure. they have already raised estimates, the report the other day now expectations are a little bit for this quarter, so watch the march
markets in europe. perhaps we're seeing a special case of that in europe. >> do you expect the euro to remain weak for the rest of the year? >> i expect the eurozone crisis to remain weak. people will look carefully at special situations across europe. >> and best performer of 2013? >> it's impossible to tell. let's say the whole of the market. >> very diplomatic answer there. david simple sop, thank you very much for coming by. some hopeful signs there. straight ahead on the program, talking of hopeful signs, our next guest is at u.s. oil production not seen since the 50s. what does it mean? we'll explore that when we come back. . >>> welcome back to "worldwide exchange." these are your headlines. the bank of japan steps up its easing agenda under heavy government pressure, doubling its inflation target and promising open ended qe starting next year. >>> president obama lays out a vision for his second term in his innagul address. >>> and this is the face of the new mr. euro. earlier, we had a nine to one ratio of decliner toes advancers.inaugural. earlier, we had a nine to one rat
. cheryl: one of the things we look on a daily basis during the market hours is what the euro is doing versus the dollar. always surprised me that the euro never went below like a $1.22 or so against the dollar. now you have the pound. i know you don't like the pound. so i'm curious kind of how you're playing that over in europe right now. >> it's been very interesting. just a year ago, everybody thought that the euro was going dramatically lower, sub 120, 115. i think the major aspect to that is what was it in relation to? we were talking about it in relation to the dollar, and the fed kept on printing money. and the ecb in contrast really has not printed money. they are not injecting new funds into this, whereas what i think is going on with sterling, you know, they are going to probably be the brink of triple dip recession come this friday in the fourth quarter gdp figures. their economy is not doing very well. they will probably have to stimulate that economy going forward. and probably talk about further asset purchases out of them over the next couple of months. cheryl: i have pl
of the health of the joint european currency, the euro. and whether, in fact, the european union as it has come to be known would remain with one of its largest members. prime minister david cameron earlier this week dropped a bomb that he was going to later in this parliamentary term in a couple of years put britain's continued membership in the european union to a vote. and right now the union is not very popular among british politicians. so perhaps feeling the heat at home, cameron is responding this way? >> and what about the relationship with angela merkel of germany who put a tremendous amount of her own personal credibility on the line to help prop up the currency? >> well, you know, britain has long brideeled-- bridled under the rules that accompany its membership in the european unionment and david cameron has been hinting that the price of staying might be negotiating a better deal for his country in some of the areas that the european union governs. >> well, angela merkel and other european politicians in response have said, wait a minute, britain can't work out os own special deal.
of the health of the joint european currency, the euro. and whether, in fact the european union as it has come to be known would remain with one of its largest members. prime minister david cameron earlier this week dropped a bomb that he was going to later in this parliamentary term in a couple of years put britain's continued membership in the european union to a vote. and right now the union is not very popular among british politicians. so perhaps feeling the heat at home cameron is responding this way? >> and what about the relationship with angela merkel of germany who put a tremendous amount of her own personal credibility on the line to help prop up the currency? >> well, you know britain has long brideeled-- bridled under the rules that accompany its membership in the european unionment and david cameron has been hinting that the price of staying might be negotiating a better deal for his country in some of the areas that the european union governs. >> well angela merkel and other european politicians in response have said, wait a minute britain can't work out os own special deal. the
of the european military system was for the euro and it was the work of franco-german relations. >> they paid tribute to the fallen of the first world war. germany and france would stand by one another. the current german and french leaders are hardly united in the struggle for stability of the european currency, but some say that is nothing new. >> there is one thing to take from 50 years since the treaty is that we do make a difference. but this is perhaps not the worst strategy for getting through the current crisis. >> for more, we have our correspondent from the parliamentary studios. franco-german relations have been put to the test over the last year. has it caused by problems to date? >> of course the two have had their cautious over the strategy meant in tackling the eurozone debt crisis. we know that merkel is very fond of talking about universality. the clashes have been stronger between other heads of government between france and germany in the past 30 years. it is so fundamental to the sense of their identity. any clashes will not seriously rock about. >> why not britain or any
% of those surveyed would prefer the uk to leave the euro. >> i should have said leave the european union. britain can't leave that monetary issue. we'll have plenty more on the relationship between britain and europe. for now, we can look at the relationship with markets. the euro stoxx 6700 is down about 0.4% today. not a done of differentiation. the biggest gainer, interestingly, is monti paschi. some of the airlines are struggling, too, on the back of ryan air's results. now take a look at what's happening across the bourses. we're seeing somewhat again of a trading pattern here after the last several trading sessions where it's not consistent. we'll get those up for you just as soon as we can. today, it's down pretty much across the board. the ibex shedding 0.12%. the cac 400.15% the. the xetra dax is also down 0.1%. the ftse 1100, same thing. pretty consistent story across these indexes here. it's a big week for earnings, too. in the meantime, let's take a look at the bond wall. it's been interesting, actually, to see the lack of action, lack of attention markets have been paying he
. >> japan is facing a $255 million euro loss for philips. >>> cutting a key interest rate by 25 basis point is the bank of india. >>> and the boj is keeping tune rate until there's a significant drop in unloimt. >>> and ahead of today's parliamentary hearing, italy's economic mip sister takes grilli takes center stage. >>> all right. reunited. back together. >> so nice. >> you know that song? >> i sang that to you the last time. we've had a couple of reunions and a series of time spent apart. >> how are things sthp. >> they are great here. how was davos? >> so far, gone, in the distant memory. don't worry about it for another year. plenty to worry about today, though. >> korea. >> on today's show, plenty of good stuff coming up. we're going to be in madrid as the prime minister is reportedly releasing a plan to relief some of the pain of austerity. >> then it's south korean steel giant posco reporting quarterly earnings today. we'll have the latest live from seoul at 10:15. and it's day one of the fomc meeting. economists are awaiting more clues from the stimulus program. we'll be live in n
policy response generally to the european union, the euro project, i should say. we have the euro group separately meeting. we have this little issue of cypress. in terms of gdp, it's little. politically, though, it could be much more significant. tie this altogether for us. how important is an essential change of power in germany to these continued effort to resolve the crisis in cypress or other member states? >> i think the key issue is that germany is a big importer from spain, italy and the periphery. if the german numbers weaken, we'll see that later in a periphery. >> especially through spain. >> ultimately, this is really an economic story. the periphery are a lagging indicator of what's going on in germany. my concern is sooner or later, these peripheral equity may start to be under pressure again. what are your positions on debt? >> i think at this stage we're still comfortable with the core. the reason, there's probably another risk off take his. whatever the reason behind it, it tends to protect the periphery, not the core. for example, france continues to perform very, very
think germany has done what was necessary to al w allow -- to make it clear that the euro is here to stay, and that's been a tremendous relief for the markets. so calm has returned. the european banking system, the interbank market, has revived so there's a general sense of let's say almost euphoria that the crisis is over. i think that is somewhat premature. because the fundamental internal inconsistencies in the dis-tim have not been addressed, and actually, therefore, you face political dangers. the euro is transforming the european union into something very different from the original conception which was a voluntary association of equal states, and instead of that, the financial created a two-class system where the euro, the creditors and debtors and the creditors are in charge. the political situation i think is going to get worse. i think the next year, next two years perhaps, are going to be very cuffy if the european union survives forever. i don't think europe can live politically with are a situation where there's are a center, namely germany, and countries like italy a
worried about the euro, the fiscal cliff, saw it as a safe currency. with the rest of the world stabilizing everyone's looking at the u.k.'s underlying fundamentals, no growth, lack of competitiveness, banks talking about weaker sterling. sterling looks vulnerable. >> what happens with the government's finances? the ocd's come out said public spending for 2012, 49% of gdp. it was 49.6% 2011. it was supposed to go down, it went up. >> the gdp numbers were much weaker than expected. we thought there would be a decent recovery in activity. it's than public spending overshot, it's that gdp has undershot. from the ratio point of view you've ended up with a higher level of public spending. >> when you talk it weakness in sterling, what is hsbc saying -- >> against 1.8150. not a huge fall but sterling is one of the weakest of the -- generally soft currencies over the next few months. >> before you go, let's move away from the u.k. just give us your -- your general view of how 2013's going to shape out on a global economy. >> it's a great rotation in the sense that i think we'll see a d
europe, having exposure to the currency, i have exposure to the euro, for a reason, is that i want -- i don't like the fact that we have twice the deficit that europe has. >> right. >> you hear a lot of bad press about europe but europe has a deficit and i want to be exposed to the euro. mostly because i think that the policies of the federal reserve is identical to those of european central bank and euro has been doing very well. and i think, i smell, everybody is bearish on something. but the story doesn't match the numbers. >> bob pisani, good to see you again. in the 2008 crash, is risk in your opinion still underpriced. and if it is, how do you explain to people to protect themselves? >> unless people have been burned, you can't convince them to get protected. and tail risks have traditionally been cheap depending on which tail. and what people fail to understand is that owning tail protection allows me to take risk elsewhere. it is not like what i spend on the tail is the overall package. it is very favorable when you have equities more attractive than bonds and other things. you
are moving a bit lower today. forex, the euro/dollar is one to watch, up 0.1% today. 1.3330. people are talking about how the ltr payment amounts to tightening. the question then becomes for some of the weaker economies whether it's too strong. dollar/yen moving up today. the yen is weakening by about 0.1%. fitch is saying british banks could need more capital. this has certainly been a theme. something, in fact, out in davos. ross, maria and everyone has been asking banks do they play to raise more capital? ross, what do they have to say about that? >> well, look, there's a lot of folks. what was interesting is when we spoke to the barclay's ceo mr. jenkins this morning said the whole industry when they were growing revenues didn't have to worry too much about costs. now they have to focus on the cost side of the business, which we know they're going to have a transformal plan and that's what they're going to be doing, as well. . capital requirements, how much capital is right when you're still going through periods of contracting growth because, obviously, the higher capital you h
? >> a lot of things have changed. it has affected the move in davos. a year ago, skepticism about the euro. today, people are happy with what they see. things have improved. there are reasons for that. it is not just a mood swing. there are a least cordial good reasons -- four good reasons. the countries in the south have made real adjustments. exports are growing. the fiscal deficits are getting smaller. that is adjustment of the national level nationthat is necessary. we have much tougher rules on how to coordinate our government policies. there was criticism about the design of the union in europe that monetary policies are the centralized. achilleas if we have coordination. that is better now that used to be. -- that can only work if we have coordination. that is much better now the is to be paid capital has gone up for most banks. we're supporting countries through the imf. there is restructuring in greece and portugal. we have a special program in spain. we have closed some situational gaps in the design of the union. we created the bailout fund. they are doing more things about omt.
of the euro and to some degree make monetary policy tighter over here. we can quickly look at the bond space. italy did go to auction as we continue to see reasonable demand for peripheral debt. the paper is selling off a little bit, but still 4.17%. investors showed up to bid on the two-year zero coupon and the five-year inflankz flagz linked bond. italy and spain continue to front load. forex, though, telling you more of this story, which is that interestingly fluff, we're seeing kind of a risk off attitu attitude. the same has been the case for loony, which now people are starting to talk about in parity with the u.s. dollar. the dollar/yen, down about 0.3% to 90.62. the euro/dollar, 1.3446. so even though it's difficult, the u.s. dollar, guys, has been performing a little better over the last couple of weeks helped by renewed growth prospects. it's one reason why a lot of people are focused on the see kweter, that chatter over the weekend about it happening could put more pressure on the greenback. back to you guys. >> kelly, thanks so much. next time, you should fly over. >> what happen
the euro zone problems, they are bubbling through, that is trouble pushing foreign banks to possibly spinoff their u.s. subsidiaries like the asset management something i have been hearing for months and months now. that's apparently it's one of the names. i'm not saying these banks are in particular in play. bankers at the wall street firms are definitely approaching these players saying you should do a deal. they are listening. when you put it all together, the macro scenario, increased regulations, euro zone problems, low trading volumes, low interest rate so you can borrow cheaply, guess what happens. you don't make enough money. when you have low interest rates you don't make a lot of money on your investment. you put all that together and you have a situation right for mergers. i don't know they will merge with ameritrade, but is there a need for two of them right now? cheryl: probably not. they traded higher at 2012 like the big guys did. so many deals going on, they were doing their banking profits, c. can have more power houses, medium-size. charlie: they were in the market
the trading day higher led by consumer discretionary and energy. the euro hitting a 11-month high versus the dollar after the ecb said banks will pay back loans faster than expected. euro rising to $1.34 in intraday trading against the greenback. >>> new home sales as we mentioned before falling last month dropping to an annual rate of 3509,000. that is last month's drop did not derail the previous gains. housing sales posted the best year since 2009, jumping 20% from a year ago, sandy. >> we have our market panel. jeff saut, chief investment strategist at raymond james. david steinberg, dls capital managing partner. let's first start with mark. the take on the rally here. it is good news, bad news. this market seems to want to continue to plow higher. >> absolutely. we have some tax clarity. we have some debt ceiling clarity. you give the market clarity, and improving economic numbers and decent earnings season hard for us not to rally higher. you know, we're closing over 1500. we closed over 1500 under monday. i think that is really bullish for the next couple of weeks at least through
's a couple of things. he said the victory lap. he said we relaunched the euro in 2012. a lot of talk with chris at this teen legarde in europe today. 2015, talking about this growth in the back half. i think draghi's intentions today were not to mess things up. the general feeling here is that what the ecb has done with the current situation, perhaps created the underlying conditions for growth. >> i hosted a dinner with christine legarde last night. one of the things that came up mario draghi said this morning that maybe we have good fall back into a problem again. >> well, that's a good question. but what we're hearing is this new buzz phrase out of davos, which is gsp. >> what is that? >> global stability put. i think larry summers may have been the one to coin this phrase. i heard it this morning when i met with a bunch of central bankers at a breakfast this morning. this phrase keeps coming up. the idea you have japan, you have the european central bank and you now have the fed obviously full throttle on monetary policy, underpinning and, you know, we meet here now in davos, the
mechanism in order to protect the euro. now we have it. now it is in place. and that's an excellent advantage. on the other hand, for financial and fiscal solidity we have the so-called fiscal compact. this, too, is in force ever since the beginning of this year, and there's now a particular point where we have to continue working, so we have improved fiscal consolidation, we have better, binding commitments, better tools, we have better mechanisms. we also have as regards banking supervision made considerable progress as of 2014, we will have a banking supervision in place in the eurozone in which, obviously, also other european countries can participate. but we're still lacking, and that's something that we need to do this year, 2013, is to see to it that over the next few years to come we also have a convergence in competitiveness within the common euro area. so not somewhere where we are sort of, um, expecting the lowest common denominator, but competitiveness that measures wealth against the best of us and against the best on the global markets. and showing us access to global
's something that has been off on the equity markets. positive comments, relinch aunc the euro. >> i remember when euro was in the last debt gross. wrong. >> great britain, uk, still eurozone. >> a lot of commotion down here. we look at the live feed from davos, switzerland. >> they're not happy. [ bell ringing ] >> at the nasdaq, starz celebrating its spin-off from liberty media. >> there's speculation about starz. but when i talked to a number of people who run various media companies, it might have been considered as buyers of that. they're saying, not me, check with that guy, and he said, not me, check with that other guy. we'll see if there's a potential acquirer of starz. >> netflix yesterday in the conference call, hastings was saying the great cable channels need us. you can't just jump in. before "breaking bad" you need a stream. >> netflix stepped in where starz has stepped out. >> s&p gainers for the year, netflix number one. >> is that true? >> up almost 59%. number two. best buy, number three dell, if you can believe that. >> name me three stocks that have come back from the dead
to a referendum. voters should decide whether the uk should stay in the 27 member euro zone. the first priority is renegotiating the eu treaty. timothy geithner at last they will be friday. president obama has elected jack lew. much of the u.s. experiencing the coldest temperatures in two years. for death are blamed on the cold snap. the bitter conditions are expected to stay into the weekend. dagen, back to you. dagen: jamie dimon apologizing. also, stepping up and saying back off. there is more regulation needed. he said all of this at the world economic forum. we are president and chief investment officer. he is in rochester, new york. maybe the only place on the planet that is colder than where you are sitting right now. >> happy to be here. dagen: what do you say to jamie dimon? there was one hedge fund manager that went after him. he said back off. >> well, jamie is right about the capitalization. he has incredibly strong capital. a lot of the standards forced the banks to have more capital, have more liquidity. it really is about rules. some of the most simple rules are the most importan
against the euro, which is at 11-3358. and gold prices are down, $1,678.20 an ounce. >>> michael corbett says the bank has the right status to generate future growth. speaking at the world economic forum in davos, he tells cnbc that several years worth of revamping efforts are beginning to pay off. >> over the last year, we've simplified the company a lot the. we've become smaller, we've become simpler. >> corbat took over in october after the resignation of chief vickram pandit. >> very sharp in the stripes. >> yeah. >> the gegco, do we have a shot at him? >> no. >> that looks pretty good. there's product in there. what do you think, it's water? there is product. and, you know -- >> davos, they tend to walk out with wet hair and it turns to ice. >> but people don't look that good in davos, normally. >> that's true. >> he looks like a banker there. i think he has a lot of potential as far as his looks go. in the world economic forum in davos is in full swing. let's get to andrew buzzing in the mountains of switzerland. you're a big apple-phile, too. >> you're hoping people look good in d
they might be overwhelming like the euro crisis have been weathered. people from america are optimistic. those from emerging markets more so, but everywhere there is a sense of caution. in pwc's annual global ceo survey released this week, 52% saw no change from the current tepid economic environment. 28% saw decline and 18% said things will get better. it is still an improvement from last year when 48% predicted a decline. the last few years of recovery followed by slow downs of political crisis, of new terror attacks from north africa have made people weary of excessive optimism. things are stable, crises have been contained, there's some growth on the horizon, but no one's ready to declare that we've turned any corners. there are no bulls in davos. no countries taking center stage. one symbol of the mood, the big splashy parties that companies like google used to throw have been quietly discontinued. not that google couldn't afford it, by the way. they just had their first year with $50 billion in revenues. underlying this caution, i believe, is a sense that growth that people had go
see the euro is trading at 1.343. dollar is down against the yen and the pound. and gold prices this morning are indicated up by about $6.50. 1,659.50 an ounce. >> it's now time for the global markets report. let's fly over to see kelly evans in the land of the caviar communist. kelly evans is in london this morning. good morning. >> andrew, good morning. as the deals go, you're going to love this one. a high profile board room battle is heating up this side of the pond. the rothschild banking dynasty is banked against one of the most powerful families in indonesia for shares of bumi. shares are up about 20% from a year ago. but these since the ipo has fallen sharply. the indonesian focused miner has called an extraordinary general meeting next month to let investors decide whether to take nat rothschild planned board shake up. this goes back to 2010. executives have advised shareholders to vote against all the charges. today, we saw this play out in realtime. nat rothschild said shareholders in this case have little choice but to push for reform. >> nick von schernding is a goo
-- trouble role, please. we're frozen at this point. yielding 1.972%. the euro yet was at a 14-month high versus the dollar. and you can see right now, the dollar is stronger against the eu euro. gold prices are down by about 6.30, $1675.30 an ounce. right now, let's get to the global markets report. ross westgate is standing by in london. good morning. we haven't seen you in quite a while. you have a lot of red behind you this morning. >> we have, indeed, becky. i saw andrew more recently than i've seen you over there in davos. yeah, look, we are down. you can see decleaners outpacing the decliners. we're down at the session low. down around .0. the spanish market down 1.5%. that's down to bank stocks. they're all off heavily because of santander. santander is europe's largest lender in the eurozone. stock off 2.3% today. there's 2012 net profit more than halved hurt by big losses in real estate, write-downs and property assets. also key growth spots as latin america down, as well. they're setting aside another 18 billion or 19 billion euros for provisions in 2012. they said they may sti
is at 1.877%. the dollar this morning after the euro picked up strength last week, the dollar is stronger against the euro and the yen and the pound. right now, dollar/yen is at 88.79. gold prices this morning up about $5.80. $1,6933. >>> german chancellor angela merkel is hoel hosting french president francois hollande and his government, his entire government in per lynn today. festivities mark 50 years since the treaty of friendship was signed. that's knight nice. a joint cabinet meeting and parliamentary session is being held also. today's events come as the two countries struggle for a common vision as crisis hit europe. and it's nice that -- >> friendship? >> yeah, after that cold and nasty occupation thing in world war ii and all. meantime, in brussels, european finance ministers are meeting. they're expected to give their approval to allow 11 states to start preparations for imposing a tax on all financial market transactions and measures likely to unsettle banks and houses. for more on the story coming out of europe today, let us head to london to kelly evans who is standing by t
and something about the world. did you see this poster from the e.u. showing all of the symbols of the euro? it showed a cross, star of david and so on and a hammer and sickle. there is a bit of an outcry from the lithuanians. and i ask why does it take the lithuanians, why aren't we in the west sympathetic enough to the persecuted under communism to object ourselves? white -- why would we leave it to them? i am relaxed about these symbols. we see a guy what they cccp with hammers and sickles and i once did a study on this on a simple magazine piece and some people say it's proof. it's kind of funny. you know, you don't see the pictures on t-shirts. it's just a t-shirt. as andrew daniels points out if we only took one good picture in this life he looks like a moon star and he got his cheekbones just right but it wasn't all that much, honestly. this is all regarding chambers, but he was a witness and a truth teller and it was really hard for him to forsake not popular approval but the approval of the people that mattered was colleagues and journalism and what we might call the liberal establ
. if you part a chart of the euro currency over mcdonald's in the last few weeks, almost been an identical chart. that's because they are so europe-focused. i continue to believe europe has too many problems and far too many currencies risks for mcdonald's. coke is concentrated exactly where you want to be which is latin america. just this week the mexican stock market hit an all-time high. the latin america market for coke is bigger than the united states, twice as big as europe. between these two companies you want to bet on latin america and coke, not europe and mcdonald's. >> well, i'll tell you, the entire trend and industry is moving away from the sugary drinks, and you saw that beverage sales in the u.s. were down 2.8% last year. we need to start moving towards the healthier drinks. that's what the consumer wants. now mcdonald's, albeit not the healthiest restaurant, but look what they are doing. they already were in the business of soft drinks. now they are moving. mr. fields, when he stepped down, he was an innovator and kept bringing new products to market and that's what mcdonal
with the impression day one day two that the whole euro crisis and the beginnings of a recovery was one of my early impressions but tail end of the week the common theme that's running through all of that of course is the jobs crisis and especially around youth and youth unemployment. i would tell you that it's on everyone's lips that we're seeing a whole generation of young people, especially here in europe which is a very big topic, but it's also a big problem in the emerging world. i would also say an unintended consequence of america's energy advantages being talked about in nearly every meeting. unintended consequence that america now suddenly won't be buying all this oil. that america won't be sending all their troops. that america won't. i dare say it's been talked about more here than it is in america. liz: let's drill down on that, so to speak. and that is because we are apparently going to be the world leader, take over from saudi arabia as the biggest output nation of oil. to me that is quite fascinating. but you say a disadvantage because why? we'd be pulling our business, we'd be pulli
, euro survived the big crisis. is there some optimism there? >> reporter: well, schwab, head of the world economic forum, optimistic smiling, says the euro didn't collapse, europe didn't fall apart, there's economic growth in the united states, there's room for optimism. i can tell you if you talk to the ceos, most of the people are ceos and in business, they are not optimistic. there is a deficit of confidence, and that's because you have budgetary problems in the united states, you have the eurozone problem, you have china, india slowing down. these other issues are very much on their agenda. so, you and i, as the week will go on, will distill this into what really they're talking. at the moment, the one word to keep in mind, risk. where it lies at the moment. >> and if they think that it's risky, business people and they're trying to get a sense of where we are with the economy if they think it's risky, how is that impacting us? everyday folks here who are looking at their, you know, paychecks and homes and wondering if it's going to change, if it's going to get better. >>
-fledged member. using the euro and everything else. i guess it makes it less likely that they'll adopt a common currency. if they're thinking about leaving the union. >> absolutely. no, there's a widespread sense of relief that britain isn't more closely tied in. if you leak at the performance of the economy, the fact britain has its own central bank, it can pursue monetary policies or policies appropriate for britain and not have to worry about other member states certainly is being taken as a sign of relief. and there's very little sentiment certainly for joining the euro now. although i will say the bank of england numbers fight they're not happy with how strong sterling is. they think currency should be weaker and it could help performance going forward. echoing the currency that we're starting to hear this year. >> no talk about becoming the 51st state which they probably have wanted to do for a while given how we excelled after we broke off. they could come back into the fold, perhaps joining the u.s. and adopt the dollar if they really wanted some -- any talk of that at this point? would
, things have slowed down so much there's been so much unemployment, 11.6% in the euro zone than it's having the opposite effect. we have to find a more dalan ba approach to how we go forward. europe has a disproportionate influence of this conversation. there is a conversation particularly vis-a-vis the united states as to how much is too much and how much austerity, how much in terms of cutting back is actually enough, christine? >> really nice to see you. when you run into indiana jones, he can have his hat back. nice to see you. >> how many bars are there over the world that have pictures of you in them? >> no, i turned 28 at a davos -- last year -- and it was one of the best birthdays ever. first time i ever ran into kings and bankers and princesses. it's really an interesting .01% of the global leaders. >> with the official public swearing inform the president all done, you know that, small matter over, the really big news of the day -- what was she wearing? look at that lovely red dress. this is not just a big story, it is epic. we'll have it coming up. but if you're looking
to see how the good ol' u.s. dollar is moving against some of these foreign exchanges. with the euro down, the pound down, they're all down against the dollar except the japanese yen which is showing a little backbone but not much. we'll be right back. officemax knows... ...tax time can be...well...taxing. so right now we'll give you... ...$10 off any turbo tax deluxe level software or higher! find thousands of big deals now... ...at officemax. >> at 20 minutes past the hour i'm lauren green with your fox news minute. a section of the mississippi river is closed to traffic as crews clean up a oil leak on sunday. it hit a railroad bridge near vicksburg, mississippi, spreading oily water across part of the waterway. >>> brazilian police arrested three people following the deaths of more than 20 in the nightclub fire in santa maria. the blaze reportedly started when a band member lit a flare on stage causing mass panic. the band's security chief and a member and owner of the kiss nightclub have been brought in for questioning. >>> french and mali troops sealed off timbuktu forcing islamist r
at euro pacific. have we turned the corner a little bit? >> i think there is reason for some optimism. i think strategically the economy is still in very bad shape. tactically, consumers are beginning to spend. that is a good thing. things are getting better. therefore people are spending. government has to take reality down the road. it has borrowed against the credit of the young and the future. meanwhile, consumers have deleveraged. they have saved a considerable amount of cash despite low interest rates. now, they are frustrated about a recession. they have negative interest rates and attempted to buy a new car. the attempted with new families to buy new housing. things are picking up, in that respect. that is good. connell: first of all, and the jobless claims, some of this may be seasonal. we may pay for this, so to speak. on your point about consumer spending, i wonder why people are more confident and they are not thinking about the issues and washington. do people just not care about that? certainly, they must care about their paycheck. isn't it discouraging to a lot of people t
. chinese real estate did not blow up. germany and greece are both still in the euro area. despite all the doom and gloom from last year, those big catastrophic event did not happen. i think it is the fading of that risk that is helping the market today. it was not just last year. the most accurate industry is actually mineralogist. they are about the only guys that get it right. we pretty much know what the weather is going to be. it is tough to kind of, know what to expect in the new year other than that the opposite. >> i do not know about always wrong, but it certainly is true that forecasters do not have a great record. connell: what are you expecting this year. it could be a completely different environment. many of those doomsday people are still expecting a mess, politically. after a while, you start to say, when will be the time that we do not get a last-minute deal? there is some percentage that fear that. is it reasonable? >> i think that is true. there certainly are some possibilities. the real fear has been kind of dissipating from the market. for example, we have lowered
of the euro is not likely anymore, and that's clearly the case. i think draghi has done a terrific job. and number three getting through the leadership transition in china and further stimulation in china. all of those three things are more positive than they have been at any point in the last several years. >> in no doubt about it. in terms of europe. you have the election in italy, bonds due, interest on the bonds due in spain. do these represent hiccups do you think? >> i think they're just challenges or marks in the journey. look at what the progress has been in europe. the progress with the fiscal constraint in portugal, in ireland, in spain. the role monti has played in italy and the leadership he's given that country. the steadfastness of merkel in germany. the fiscal restraint in the uk. all of these are saying we get it collectively. we need to show restraint, but we need to restructure at a pace our societies can absorb so we're going to have a continued series of steps. there's no big bang answer. >> speaking of the u.s. for a moment, a number of banks are getting out of fix
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 52 (some duplicates have been removed)